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Tech Support Blog

Malicious Browser Extension Targets Google Chrome and Firefox Users

Recently, there has been a malicious browser extension discovered that is threatening the Internet security of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox users.  The browser extension has been hijacking users’ Facebook accounts and gaining access to many people’s personal information.  However, the extension doesn’t only access your information.  It also actively takes complete control of your Facebook account and performs multiple actions without your consent.

This Trojan, identified as Trojan:JS/Febipos.A, can perform many actions when it gains access to your Facebook profile.  These actions include liking pages, commenting on pages, sharing links, inviting friends to new groups and even directly chatting with your friends through Facebook Messenger.  The Trojan uses these capabilities make posts that link other Facebook users to malicious websites.  People have also reported this software as posting links to a website for automobile sales on infected users’ profiles.  Read more »


Casual Gaming Rocks the Hardcore World

Online gaming has taken a few major turns in recent years, especially in terms of type of players and company business models. Until recently, most games on the Internet were for hardcore gamers. Now, anyone can find a game online that he or she will enjoy playing.

Social networking games have created a window into the gaming world for casual players by creating thousands of games that are free and very easy to play. These games come with a revolutionary business model that other types of games are slowly adopting.

Massively Multiplayer Online games, known as MMOs, are a type of game in which players from all over the world can play the game together in an online world. MMOs can be any type of game, but Role Playing Games (or RPGs) are the most popular. These MMORPGs, like the well-known World of Warcraft game, are beginning to change.

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The Electronic Health Record May Eventually Be The Future Of Health Care.

The United States is full of fiercely independent people.  These independent Americans have a tendency to resist any form of change that involves the United States government.  When the U.S. Postal Service first adopted the ZIP code, these independent alarmists preached that the government was categorizing its citizens!  While members of this same subculture have resisted the Electronic Health Record, they are not the biggest obstacle to the adoption of the new technology.  Doctors have actually been slower to adapt to the practical development of the EHR than consumers or developers!

In case you have not heard of it, Electronic Health Records are a relatively new concept that would provide doctors with a universal framework for medical records through the United States government.  The Federal government has sought to create both an identification card and a standardized computer system that would make your medical records completely portable.  More than simply a database, the EHR would completely overhaul the field of health informatics.

The Electronic Health Record would be accessible through the Internet or a more protected government/medical intranet (this is part of the technology that is still under development and the subject of much debate).  In order to gain access to your records, you would need to provide your identification card.  Swiping your identification card in the EHR terminal, your doctor would have complete access to your entire medical history.  The EHR is not a system like stuffy old medical records; it is more like a Cloud-based multimedia presentation!  Every doctor you have ever had will make notes in your EHR and they may include photographs, diagrams and even video footage of their procedures!

. . . At least, that is the theory of how the EHR will work.  Despite mandates and government incentives, many doctors have not purchased an Electronic Health Record system.  There is a sizable portion of physicians who have purchased their EHR hardware, but have not used it yet!  In addition to bearing the expense of the EHR system, many doctors have been resistant to take the time to learn the new computer system that the Electronic Health Record creates.  Moreover, doctors with vastly different proficiencies in using the system contribute to each patient’s record.  If a particularly loquacious doctor provides an extensive narrative that is read by a doctor who just needs bullet points, your treatment may be delayed.  Similarly, if a doctor does not provide all necessary information in a useful fashion, your next doctor may misdiagnose any subsequent ailment.

The theory behind the Electronic Health Record is that you will have an entirely portable medical history.  If your job transfers you to a different part of the country or you get hurt on vacation, your EHR record will give doctors in any medical facility every medical fact about you.  But because the system requires doctors to learn how to both contribute to and gather data from the Electronic Health Record, it is clear that the practical implementation of the EHR is still many years away.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


Antiviral Programs: Stick With What The Professionals Use!

In the wake of news stories about viruses and identity theft, Internet security remains a very real concern for everyone who goes online today.  Internet security issues have created a big business for programmers in the virus removal industry. But with dozens of computer anti-virus programs available on the market, it is hard to know which provides the best virus removal and the greatest Internet security.  For that, the best response may be overkill.

Researching Internet security issues and virus removal protocols is enough to make the head spin of anyone who is not a trained computer expert.  Astute computer users who just want to check out what the current threats to their computer are become baffled by technical jargon.  Looking at reports from the major Internet security companies like Symantec are likely to leave the average computer user confused.  After reading their report on the Packed.Generic.340, most computer users will not know how serious a threat it represents to their computer or if they need any form of virus removal.

Many companies that specialize in Internet security rely upon more than one antiviral software product to ensure they are adequately protecting their computer or network.  Some of the leading Internet security companies take the time to test the leading products on criteria like malware detection and virus removal.  AV Comparatives recently released their report on their tests of anti-viral software.  Even that, though, may be too much for the common computer user to handle and process.  Their testing methods are rigorous, methodical and designed for the best minds in Internet security and virus removal to understand.

Businesses only survive online when they have adequate Internet security and powerful virus removal.  Thousands of businesses and home computer users use the Rescuecom Internet Security Suite.  Rescuecom has one of the most reputable Internet security and virus removal products on the market.  As a leader in Internet security and virus removal, Rescuecom has a proven track record for business and home computer users.  Even though the Rescuecom Internet Security Suite may have more virus removal options and greater Internet security provisions than the average user is likely to need, you have to ask, “If the professionals are using this much protection, shouldn’t I?”

The answer, of course, is that you should.  With the threats of identity theft, infections that require aggressive virus removal and emerging Internet security concerns, private computer users should not skimp on their anti-viral software: overkill is safer than being under protected.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


The Joy of Being a Technology Lab Rat

With so much new technology bombarding us left and right, it’s hard to decide on the right time to upgrade to a newer model of a product or even try out something new. Many people are aware of the fact that brand new technology often needs quite a bit of initial tweaking to fix production glitches that are missed in the testing phase. It’s often the case that a few days into a new product’s debut, problems start to emerge, as was the case with Apple’s iPhone 4S, where Siri and battery problems began to show.

For many enthusiasts, this is hardly a problem—many enjoy being an indirect contributor to the success of gadgets by testing them out. If you’re so eager to try out a new product that you’re willing to work through any initial limitations, then by all means, go for it. Certainly, if you’re an experienced technology lab rat, you probably know what to expect. You might be such a loyal Apple or Android user that you actively push your new smartphone or tablet to its limits in the attempt to discover its strengths and weaknesses. Still, dropping your device or trying every single app you can get your hands on aren’t exactly the best approaches. Trying out too many apps, especially, can clog-up your device, not to mention pose security threats. Over the last four months, for example, the number of apps with malware in the Android market went up by over 400 percent!

On the other hand, if you’re just getting into the tech market and are thinking of standing in line for the new Windows phones, Nokia Lumia 800, for example, keep in mind that as cool as the latest technology is, it often costs more than just big bucks. You could find yourself waiting anywhere from a few weeks to a few months for software upgrades and security patches, which could limit your new device’s initial functionality.

Another thing to keep in mind is supply and demand. As more manufacturers push their products onto the market, competition will grow. The heightened competition will benefit consumers in more ways than just lowering prices. Companies will face each other in the OS battlefield, each trying to beat the others in quality and elegance.

Manufacturers learn from their mistakes, which is a good thing in the end, but it also means that consumers willing to buy the latest gadgets have to agree to be technology lab rats, for a short while, at least.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


Smarter Malware is on the Rise

After a two-year investigation known as Operation Ghost, a group of Eastern European cyber thieves was caught by the FBI, according to an article by ABC News. The story is yet another reminder of some of the problems with global Internet security and the need to get professional virus removal. The group used a complex scheme that even infiltrated the computers of U.S. government agencies, which shows how susceptible Internet security can be even at the governmental level.

The group made $14 million in “illegitimate income” before the FBI put an end to the scheme, according to ABC News. The group infected over four million computers with malware that played an essential role in their advertising scheme. The seven hackers known as the Rove group compromised the Internet security of users and targeted sites like iTunes, Netflix and even the IRS, reports ABC News.

The malware that they used to infect the compromised computers sheds light on a serious Internet security and virus removal problem. According to the article, the malware prevented users from installing virus removal programs that could potentially defuse it. This is an example of an emerging challenge to virus removal programs, as it marks an increases level of stealth and sophistication on the part of malware. Not only are hackers writing malware to breach Internet security, but they are also programming it to strongly resist virus removal efforts. In other words, malware is becoming more conscious of the fact that it is malware, making basic virus removal much more difficult for the average user.

The hackers allegedly partnered with a variety of Internet advertisers to enact a scheme based on targeting users’ Internet security to generate profits, reports ABC News. Advertisers paid the hackers to generate traffic to certain advertisements and websites. They did this by using the malware that they designed to redirect casual Internet users to advertisement websites. By doing so, the hackers increased click results and generated profit from their partner advertisers.

This story also shows that threats to Internet security go beyond the programming level and into the field of international organized crime. Hackers frequently operate internationally, breaching users’ Internet security in one continent while operating in another.

The fact that a group of seven hackers made approximately $14 million dollars by spreading malware is a scary reminder that the incentives to target Internet security is real and, for many, great. That is all the more reason to make every effort to protect our Internet security.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


Smartphone Virus Removal is Still Budding

The way the smartphone market is heading, those things that once allowed us to make phone calls and send text messages (what where they called again?) will quickly be forgotten. In their place (oh, that’s right, phones) the standard communication device will be the smartphone. Smartphones are becoming more like computers and less like phones. Apple’s iPhone and Google’s Android, the two systems currently dominating the market, already work like mini computers. Given this slow but inevitable shift in the functionality of phones, it is important to remember that they are becoming more susceptible to Internet security issues and may encounter problems that require virus removal.

As browsing capabilities on smartphones become more sophisticated, users are able to access more websites, many of which pose a risk to a smartphone’s Internet security. Downloading email attachments, for example, carries Internet security risks. Internet security is also threatened by using unsafe networks. The biggest threat to Internet security, though, is mobile apps. According to an article in The Telegraph, malicious software attacks on smartphones are on the rise.

Cyber criminals are rushing to write new virus software that can breach smartphones’ Internet security and record private and sensitive user data such as bank account information or login passwords. Such increasing threats require users to employ the necessary measures to ensure their phones’ Internet security.

Unfortunately, sometimes even the best Internet security precautions fail, causing smartphones to require virus removal efforts. Virus removal for smartphones is relatively new territory, which is why users shouldn’t gamble with their devices and risk losing valuable data and money because of amateurish virus removal. Smartphone users should seek out professionals in virus removal, like Rescuecom who have a long history of providing Internet security services, as well as virus removal services for a variety of computers and computer-based devices.

The transformation of the phone into the smartphone marks an exciting and important time in the development of technology. It signals the marriage of complex technology and basic tools. But while we drool over the potential that these devices bring with them, we should remember that as computers, they require more advanced tech support to stay healthy. They also require us to pay more attention to Internet security and to get the right kind of virus removal if that ever becomes necessary.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


Is your computer really secure?

Most people have some form of virus removal software on their computer.  Despite that fact, a significant proportion of those users will have to deal with an Internet security issue at some point in their computing career.  This is because the threat environment online is dynamic; it evolves constantly, trying to outfox the Internet security providers and get to your data.  How can you be sure that your virus removal software is providing the most comprehensive protection?  Here are some questions you should ask in shopping for virus removal software:

1)  Is the virus removal software you’re considering from an established, reputable provider?  It’s important that you be able to trust your virus removal software.  Most brands will have reviews posted online, which can help you decide if that particular program will fit your needs.  Conversely, choosing a virus removal program without investigation carries many risks, not least among them the risk of having your Internet security compromised by a bogus “diagnostic scan.”

2)  What happens when the software detects a threat?  It is important to make a distinction between virus detection software and virus removal software.  Virus detection software will find a threat and then notify the user, leaving them to deal with the threat by themselves.  Virus removal software will detect the threat, isolate it, and then remove it from the computer, usually with little or no input from the user.

3)  How often does the software update its threat registry?  As mentioned above, the ways in which hackers test your Internet security are constantly changing.  It is important, therefore, to make sure that your virus removal software updates its threat registry regularly and often.  These updates will allow your virus removal software to detect and cope with the newest Internet security threats as they appear.

4)  Exactly what features does your virus removal software offer?  Before committing to a particular program, take a look at what it can offer you.  While it is true that some Internet security companies offer only bare-bones virus removal packages, others include things like personal firewalls for added security, or spam filters for your email accounts.  Just as with any other purchase, the goal when shopping for Internet security programs is to get the most value for your dollar.

5)  Does the software company stand by their product?  Let’s be clear: no matter how comprehensive your virus removal software is, no matter how careful you are with your permissions, there is still a chance that you will eventually have to deal with a breach of your Internet security.  Another important question when shopping for virus removal software is: what happens then?  Does the Internet security company have support personnel standing by, or is it up to the user to fix the problem?

These are just some of the important questions you should ask yourself when shopping for Internet security software.  Answering these questions before you buy will ensure that you get the best possible protection for your computer.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


SmartSwipe Your Way to Safer Online Shopping

If you’ve ever been in a small pizzeria or a local family diner that has just recently started accepting credit cards, you might have seen a little gadget that’s attached to the checkout computer—a small credit card reader. With the advances in network services, it has become very easy to attach a credit card reader to almost any computer with an Internet connection. In fact, if you’d like to swipe away your credit cards at home, then by all means, go for it. SmartSwipe is a small, very cool personal credit card reader that can be used to read credit cards at home or in the office.

SmartSwipe isn’t just a cool way of playing shop at home. Sure, you can swipe away your credit cards when shopping online to get a more commercial feel for your transactions, but there’s more to this credit card reader than fun. SmartSwipe adds an entire new dimension of security to your online financial activities that involve using credit cards. No matter how secure you think your Internet connection is, and regardless of how advanced your anti-virus software is, when you enter your credit card information, you still face some Internet security risks. SmartSwipe reduces (or maybe even eliminates) these risks by encrypting your credit card data before it reaches the information field. This way, if a hacker is trying to monitor your keystrokes or remotely observe your screen, he or she will not be able to see the information you enter.

Under normal circumstances, when you use a credit card to make an online purchase, the website you’re using scrambles (encrypts) your data to prevent hackers from seeing it in its raw form. However, if your device is infected with spyware, for example, that program will have access to the data before it is encrypted. SmartSwipe encrypts the data in its external hardware so that by the time it reaches your computer, it’s protected.

The safe credit card reader is an essential tool for people who regularly enter their credit card information online, whether it’s for online shopping or other financial transactions. As Identity theft problems increase, it’s essential for users to safeguard their private information.

The device is easy to use and connects to your computer via a USB port. Additionally, it is compatible with all major credit cards including Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, and JCB.

SmartSwipe doesn’t come with hidden fees, according to its manufacturer, and using it is completely free after you have purchased the product. The device also helps protect you from accidentally buying the same product twice as it only accepts one purchase per transaction.

To investigate how well the card reader actually works, CBS affiliate, KUTV, independently put it to the test. The show’s producers attempted to get access to a volunteer’s credit information as she completed two transactions, one with SmartSwipe and one without it. Sure enough, when she used SmartSwipe, the (friendly) hacker wasn’t able to see any of her information. On the other hand, when she didn’t use the device, all her data was visible.

Costliness aside, the SmartSwipe looks elegant, connects to your computer easily, and, most importantly, adds a priceless level of security to your online financial transactions, and really, can you put a price tag on that?

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


Don’t Take the Facebook Lollipop

A new Facebook app has been circulating the web just in time for Halloween, and it’s offering a spooky reminder of how susceptible our Internet security is these days.

The app is among the most sophisticated to appear on Facebook. A blue lollipop with a razor inside it greets users. “Connect to Facebook” reads the button beneath it. Next comes the usual permission request that asks users to grant access to their private information, in other words, to put Internet security aside. A few seconds later, a video begins to play. The scene opens to a dark, musty looking corridor with creepy music playing in the background. A dirty, sweaty man sits behind an ancient computer. He logs into Facebook, but what shows up on the screen is not his account. It’s yours.

For the next minute or so, he clicks through your photos and reads your actual wall posts as he appears to be tormented by some kind of rage, anger, or jealousy. Before long, he types in your location, pulls up an online map, and heads to his car. He’s coming for you.

The scariest part of the video is that the crazed man out to get you doesn’t hack into a network service in order to breach your Internet security. Nor is he even part of your immediate network. He has access to your information because it’s all public. Even when you think you’re protecting your Internet security by adjusting your privacy settings, “Take This Lollipop” is an example of how we frequently opt out of maintaining high Internet security to allow apps Facebook access. Every time we allow an app access to our information, we are essentially signing a waiver to allow our Internet security to be breached.

To generate the video, users need to access it from an external website that connects to Facebook. This shows that Internet security problems extend past internal Facebook apps, especially since we now regularly link Facebook to external websites. We also access it through a variety of network services. In fact, threats to Internet security don’t even need advanced network services anymore. Even a creepy stalker in a basement that shows no evidence of a sophisticated network service can access your private information.

As Wi-Fi and 4G become standard in so many devices, accessing Facebook has become a right, not a privilege. We now expect to find Facebook embedded into smartphones and tablets. The increased reliance on Facebook for even the most basic communication brings with it a heightened threat to our Internet security.

The name of the app is in itself a message against the dangers of careless Internet security practices. Allowing Facebook apps to access your account may not be a primary threat to your network services the way virus are, but it is still a major threat to your personal and Internet security.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


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© 1997-2021 RESCUECOM Corporation
Patented - Patent Numbers: 6,898,435, 8,832,424 and 9,477,488
Additional Patents Pending