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The Catch-22 Of The Cloud

When Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2 dropped on DVD, a big part of the advertising campaign was that the fully-loaded version included an UltraViolet Digital Copy. UltraViolet uses the Cloud platform and with popular movies streaming from it, this is becoming many consumers’ first experience with the Cloud. While the idea of the Cloud may seem like a strong one, it has a number of risks to consumers.

The Cloud, as it pertains to media, is a form of online storage where companies produce material and give access to it to paying customers.  As a form of online storage, users have access to files without downloading or uploading them.  For those who buy the DVD and Blu-Rays that have UltraViolet copies, they access the online storage vault from UltraViolet when they want to watch their movie.  The file then streams from the online storage point in the Cloud to your computer, smartphone or other cloud-connected device.

The Cloud is banking on customers not wanting to use up hard drive space for digital copies of their media.  Companies using the Cloud see online storage as a way to prevent pirating.

Consumers have many reasons to be wary.  Because the online storage of the Cloud requires a connection, Internet security issues are a very real concern for users.  Threats to Internet security through viruses may be easier to control with the Cloud, but they are also easier to disseminate.  As soon as the Cloud-based version of a file is corrupted, every computer using that file may be infected.  To date, Internet security providers have neither illustrated such a problem nor a defense against it.  Users who are unsure of their own Internet security measures are wary of online storage like the Cloud.

The vendors using Cloud-based media are also are arguing that the Cloud-based media will not wear or scratch the way traditional DVDs, CDs and Blu-Ray discs do.  But Cloud-based vendors are neglecting the basic psychology of ownership.  For sure, an online storage vault is a convenient idea, but it leaves consumers without something physical to feel they own.  The Cloud-based online storage concept suffers the same defect as the MiniDisc in the area of the psychology of ownership; consumers pay more for something they do not see and cannot feel, making them feel like they overpaid.

Internet security issues aside, Cloud users have every reason to doubt the long-term viability of the scheme.  Technology changes fast, and paying more money for a service or company that may not exist in a few years makes consumers less likely to try new technologies.  The music store The Wall used to guarantee CDs with their sticker on them for life.  Those who still have CDs from The Wall now have a worthless guarantee.  Between the Internet security issues and the fact that online storage methods like the Cloud have not been tested in the long-term, users have every reason to remain wary of spending the extra money now.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


There’s a New Tablet in Town

The computer tablet market is about to be shaken-up. Amazon’s Kindle Fire is almost here, and the tablet is already causing a stir. Analysts and bloggers agree that the advent of the Kindle Fire will usher in an era of real tablet competition. Several of the Kindle Fire’s features suggest that it is going to give apple’s iPad a run for its money. On the other hand, despite its great price of $199 (which International Business Times believes is a net loss for Amazon), the tablet has a few tech support and Internet security issues that are worth considering.

First of all, the Kindle Fire has several intriguing qualities like stereo speakers and 169 pixels per inch resolution, but these relatively high-tech features may require extra tech support down the road.

The Kindle’s Silk web browser is another interesting feature of the tablet, but according to ZDNet, the software has serious Internet security problems. The browser will make surfing the Internet super fast, but at a cost to Internet security and user privacy. To increase the browsing speed, the Silk browser depends on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) to act as a Web proxy. As web browsing becomes delocalized with data passing through a third party (the Amazon cloud), Internet security threats are bound to increase. Users who use this feature may witness an increase in their need for tech support.

The good news is that users can enhance the tablet’s Internet security by turning off the Silk’s cloud-enhanced mode. Using the Silk in offline mode prevents data from passing through Amazon’s cloud, improving Internet security but also slowing down the browsing experience.

The Kindle’s traditional function as an e-book reader has been significantly revamped with this new model. Users will be able to use this tablet to watch rich color movies and television shows, listen to music, read magazines, browse the web, play games, and of course, read books. There are a few advantages to using the Kindle Fire to do all this rather than, say, an iPad. For example, Amazon’s tablet is almost a third of the price of an iPad2. Also, the Kindle Fire offers paid access to millions of books, millions of songs, and over 100,000 television shows and films.

According to PCWorld, Android-based apps and their related tech support for Amazon’s Kindle are limited. Since the Kindle Fire runs on a system similar to Google’s Android, future changes to the OS may create significant tech support issues for the Kindle Fire.

If Amazon’s tech support for the Kindle is anything like its customer care, then you can plan on finding quality tech support to help deal with the Internet security and other problems that require tech support. Still, the longer you wait before buying the product, the more you can count on tried and tested tech support and maybe even better Internet security.

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


Malicious Software Finally Hits Your iPad

Hackers continue attempting to exploit the Internet security of the growing population of iPad owners.  Analysts’ estimate over five million iPads and iPad 2s sold in the first quarter of 2011 alone. It is obvious why malicious software programmers seek to take advantage with those sales figures.  Apple’s normally excellent Internet security is occasionally breached, and the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch are currently vulnerable to the latest malicious software abuse.

Read more »


Apple Gives Up Adobe Flash War: Both Companies Win!

The digital video making and viewing community came together a little more, recently.  Apple lifted the ban on Adobe Flash Player appearing in iPhone or iPad, ending online compatibility issues.

Last year, Apple refused to work with Flash, the most popular additional program for creating and viewing multi-media websites. The media creation and viewing program’s use restricted costumers to certain devices. Adobe blocked access to Flash from Apple devices. Apple’s continually expanding mobile devices struggled to view images and videos supported by the additional program.

Read more »


Cool Product: Inkling

Students know about the cost and weight of text books. Across campuses upperclassmen share tricks for avoiding college bookstore prices and bursting backpacks. A new iPad application has a simple and easy new solution for students.

Inkling has contracted with Apple to create an application for putting textbooks on the iPad. Focused on making college life a little easier and cheaper, the Inkling application publishes interactive versions of textbooks. The biggest features include music attachments, note taking and sharing capabilities, and social networking.

Inkling’s application does four crucial things for the college student:

·         Saves money –Hundreds of dollars get spent on textbooks every year. Instead of hunting through used book stores or posting requests to buy books off last semester’s students, textbooks can cost next to nothing without wasting time. Save even more money buying one chapter at a time and avoid paying for unnecessary chapters.

·         Relieves carrying load– Textbooks are usually huge, heavy items that some students have trouble carrying around. Any student can carry an iPad in one hand with nearly no effort. Personal notes from lectures or reading can be entered onto the page, decreasing the need for pens, notebooks, and Post- its. Students no longer need a heavy bag of supplies to be prepared for class.

·         Saves paper. – Inkling is attractive to environmentally concerned students. Many textbooks cannot be recycled, so reducing print production also saves a natural resource. The paperless approach also decreases chances of paper cuts.

·         Provides instant discussion groups– Linked with Facebook, students can share ideas and questions about the text without waiting for a specified time and place. The discussion lasts without class time restraints. Students and professors can enter notes into the application while reading, and even scan over notes from other readers for different ideas. Terms central to the chapter can be touched for definitions and better understanding.

Inklings created a design which also translates to the print world. Text appears clearly on the screen, including page numbers found on print copies of the same book. Students can follow professor’s directions to parts of the text, or reference the text in an essay.

Currently, the Inkling application includes 25 textbooks. Many more textbooks are in production, and Inkling has deals with textbook publishers like McGraw-Hill and Pearson to start creating more. Students still can enjoy some financial and physical relief with the titles currently available. 

 

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


There Is Something Other Than The iPad

Acer, known for competitively priced and dependable laptops, is expanding into personal computer tablets, creating another option for buyers. The newest release since company president Jim Wong started the tablet and smartphone division is the Iconia Tab A500. The Iconia is already offering competition to the well-known Apple iPad.

Both iPad and Iconia have cameras on the front and the back of the tablet for creating videos and taking pictures which are stored on the tablet. Each tablet has a dual core processing chip for fast and clear movement through the applications. Either tablet can be designed so favorite applications appear on the user’s homepage. Both tablets are light and easy to carry around.

Apple’s iPad still has more applications included in the tablet and available at the online store than the Android. Each application is easily located and opened on the home screen, too. Honeycomb first requires users to search through applications and find the program to arrange the favorites.  Third party applications are not present on the Iconia tablet, such as access to Netflix or Hulu.com. Apple already offers a variety of applications to users.

The Iconia runs Honeycomb 3.0, an Android system from Google. Honeycomb presents as a more reliable version than the Froyo, or Android 2.2. The system is truly multi-media with the ability to connect with different devices like a TV, a personal computer, or a smartphone. Videos and pictures can transfer to the TV or home computer with the Iconia. Users only need an HDMI port, a microSD memory card or a USB port to connect the machines. The system works with Adobe Flash, making video viewing online easier. The Iconia also comes with a longer battery life than iPad.

Apple has controlled the tablet market since the release of the iPad. Competitors have struggled to keep up in applications, easy use and general attraction. Competitors like Playbook, Xoom and G-Slate fail in comparison to iPad in reliability, easy use or price. Acer prices the Iconia at a more competitive rate. The iPad’s latest version prices at $499, while the Iconia starts at $449.99.

Apple’s iPad is still the tablet with the most applications, and iPad is the easiest to use. IPad offers more colorful case options, too. But, Acer is releasing another tablet later this summer with more updates to the software. For those tablet users who do not want to buy Apple, Iconia offers at least one affordable solution.

 

About RESCUECOM:

RESCUECOM provides computer repair and computer support, 24/7: Meeting every tech support need including data recovery, virus removal, networking, wireless services, and computer support for all brands of hardware and software. For computer support or information on products, services, or computer repair, visit https://www.rescuecom.com or call 1-800-RESCUE-PC.

For More Information, Contact:

David Milman, CEO

315-882-1100

david@rescuecom.com


HP’s Slate Targets Enterprise, Not the iPad

HP, long expected to be one of Apple’s main competitors in the tablet market, has fired its first shot at the competition, and it’s an interesting one.

With little fanfare, the company released its Slate 500 tablet, running Microsoft’s Windows 7 OS.  Since HP acquired Palm earlier this year, it had been widely speculated that the company’s first tablet release would feature Palm’s WebOS.

HP has now announced that a WebOS tablet will be released sometime in 2011. Read more »


Verizon Does Galaxy Tab No Favors With Pricing

Verizon has become the first of the major U.S. carriers to announce pricing for Samsung’s Galaxy Tab.

In a somewhat surprising move, Verizon has priced the Tab at $600, just $30 less than the Apple iPad bundle the carrier will put on sale on October 28.

Neither device will require a contract with Verizon, allowing users to purchase the device on its own. Read more »


Windows Phone 7 — Microsoft Gets Back in the Game

Microsoft officially announced its Windows Phone 7 OS on Monday and, by doing so, put itself firmly back into the smartphone market.

Totally disconnected from Microsoft’s previous phone OS offerings, Windows Phone 7 continues the pattern first displayed in the Internet Explorer 9 Beta – a product more in line with the competition than the company’s previous work. Read more »


Tablets: Apple Expands While LG Postpones

As Apple continues to aggressively market the iPad, one of its expected competitors has dropped from the race.

This past summer, LG announced plans to build and release a tablet device running Google’s Android OS.  LG’s Android tablet was expected to be released this year, as a competitor for the iPad.

LG announced today that will not happen. Read more »


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Patented - Patent Numbers: 6,898,435, 8,832,424 and 9,477,488
Additional Patents Pending